Measures 2

CORE-34 (CORE OM)

 

The CORE-OM is a 34-item generic measure of psychological distress, which is pan-theoretical (i.e., not associated with a school of therapy), pan-diagnostic (i.e. not focused on a single presenting problem), and draws upon the views of what practitioners considered to be the most important generic aspects of psychological wellbeing health to measure. It typically takes between 5-10 minutes to complete.

© CORE Systems Trust

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CORE-10

A short, 10 item version of the CORE-OM, perfect for session-by-session monitoring, can be used as a screening tool and outcome measure when the CORE-OM is considered too long for routine use. 

© CORE Systems Trust

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YP-CORE

The Young Persons CORE (YP-CORE) is a 10-item measure derived from the CORE-OM and designed for use in the 11-16 age range. Structure is similar to that of the CORE-OM but with items rephrased to be more easily understood by the target age group.

© CORE Systems Trust

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IES-15

The Impact of Events Scale (IES) is the original  measure designed to measure intrusion and avoidance following a traumatic incident(s). The IES has 15 items, seven of which measure intrusive symptoms such as thoughts, nightmares, feelings, and images associated with the specific event. Five of these items reflect intrusive symptoms whilst awake and two reflect intrusion during sleep (nightmares, insomnia). The avoidance subscale has eight items such as numbing of responsiveness, and avoidance of feelings and situations. The intrusion and avoidance components are combined to produce a total score.

© Horowitz

Ref: Horowitz, M.J., Wilner, M. & Alverez, W. (1979). Impact of Events Scale: A measure of subjective stress. Psychosomatic Medicine, 41(3), 209-218.

IES-R

Because the 15 item IES does not include a hyper-arousal sub-scale, considered to be the third major symptom of post traumatic stress, the IES-R was developed with the addition of 7 more items to measure the hyper-arousal.

© Weiss & Marmar

Ref: Weiss D, Marmar C (1997) In: J Wilson and T Keane (Eds) Assessing Psychological Trauma and PTSD. New York: Guilford Press, 98-135.

IES-E

Working with British organisations, Noreen Tehrani wanted a measure to assess the degree of trauma typically following incidents in the workplace or related to work. She felt that the IES-R had not been developed in the naturalistic style of the original IES and developed her own alternative 23 item measure, the IES-E, instead.

© Tehrani

Ref: Tehrani, N., Cox, S., & Cox, T. (2002) Assessing the impact of stressful incidents in organizations: the development of an extended impact of events scale. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, Volume 15, Number 2, 1 June 2002 , pp. 191-200(10)

PRN-F5

The Pragmatic research Network Feedback measure (PRN-F7) is ideal for administering immediately after a session in order to assess the client's level of satisfaction with the session. It includes 1 free-text boxes where rthe client is invited to provide feedback about anything particularly helpful or unhelpful.

© 2014 Manyother Ltd 

 

PRN-F7

The Pragmatic research Network Feedback measure (PRN-F7) is ideal for administering in the days soon after a session in order to assess the client's level of satisfaction with the session. It includes 3 free-text boxes where rthe client is invited to provide feedback about anything particularly helpful or unhelpful.

© 2014 Manyother Ltd 

 

SRS

The Session Rating Scale is an an ultra-brief 4 item visual analogue scale that measures 4 domains; relationship, goals and topics, approach or method, overall. using 10cm lines in the paper version. Being quick to administer and score it is ideal for use on a sessional basis in a wide variety of contexts to obtain feedback from the client on that session.

© 2000, Scott D Miller & Barry L Duncan

 

SES

The session experience scale (SES) is an ultra-brief 3 item measure to assess the client feedback on the session, with questionas about being heard, the session focus and the goals of the client.

© 2011 Jason A. Seidel, Psy.D

 

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page last updated: 13/07/2017

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